Eweek has an interesting piece on a proof of concept hyperjacking rootkit that’s about to do the rounds of the security shows…

“The idea behind Blue Pill is simple: your operating system swallows
the Blue Pill and it awakes inside the Matrix controlled by the ultra
thin Blue Pill hypervisor. This all happens on-the-fly (i.e. without
restarting the system) and there is no performance penalty and all the
devices,” she explained.

Rutkowska stressed that the Blue Pill technology does not rely on
any bug of the underlying operating system. “I have implemented a
working prototype for Vista x64, but I see no reasons why it should not
be possible to port it to other operating systems, like Linux or BSD
which can be run on x64 platform,” she added.

Interesting times…

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While I may be buried in the ballroom of a hotel in Brooklyn, well into my second day of non-stop PowerPoint on the next Microsoft Office (I'm assuming that there are five boroughs out there somewhere…), here's a little SOA associated piece from El Reg for your delectation:

The recent 4.1 release of BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES) from Research in Motion (RIM) opens the door to a new set of mobile development tools and technologies. BlackBerries aren't just for email – they're also a secure pipe to and from your network. With the latest build of RIM's MDS (Mobile Data Services) platform bundled with BES 4.1, BlackBerries are able to take advantage of any web services in your, and your partners', networks, and can quickly become a secure input device. If you've got BES 4.1 running on your network, turning your Blackberry services on is nearly as easy as downloading RIM's MDS Studio application, although it's a hefty download at well over 230MB. You'll also need to pull down the documentation and sample applications at the same time. The Studio includes a BlackBerry simulator, so you can test applications as you build them.

Read on here. And a big hand to the folk at RIM, who were able to get me the code despite their download server having a serious meltdown, so I was able to deliver my copy literally as the taxi driver who was taking us to Heathrow rang the doorbell…

I spent last Friday morning braving the delights of Highway 17 over the Santa Cruz mountains in the rain at Azul Systems' offices next door to Google in Mountain View, learning lots of interesting stuff about their Vega processor and their network attached processing tools, including their "pauseless" Java garbage collection.

You can read about some of my morning at The Register:

Adding storage to a network is straightforward; adding processing power tends to involve a lot more complexity. This is something Azul Systems aims to change. Following the recent announcement of its second generation Vega processor, is today’s news that BT will be using the company's processing appliances to handle both its existing web applications, as well as providing the foundation for a utility computing farm – part of BT’s 21st Century Network.

The Azul platform is more than just a box you connect to your network, which replaces software virtual machines. It’s also a set of tools for managing application performance and handling how you bill the rest of the business for CPU usage. Mainframe administrators will be familiar with these techniques, but they’re still new to the arrays of application servers that now run many of our businesses. Being able to bill for actual CPU and memory usage is a key part of any utility computing platform – whether it’s Sun’s $1 per CPU per hour or an IT department billing the rest of the business for application operations.

They've got quite an impressive server room too, especially when you realise that each of those boxes has 384 cores – so that's the equivalent of 9600 CPUs in this rack alone:

Not bad – and what's more important, not too power hungry.

A series of photographs of UMPC prototypes and concept devices, taken at Intel’s IDF Spring event in San Francisco.

1. UMPC at work, 2. UMPC at rest, 3. Concept UMPC, 4. Concept UMPC, 5. Concept UMPC, 6. The Real UMPC, 7. The Real UMPC

A fascinating device – qand one that will make an excellent mobile client for service architectures.

Most UI tools come with libraries of reference controls. Coding up a drop down menu can be a more of a problem than you first think – so approaches like Flash’s Halo and the control libraries shipping with Microsoft’s Expression Interactive Designer are considerable time savers…

Yahoo! has given AJAX developers the same sort of bootstrap, with its User Interface Library.

The Yahoo! User Interface Library is a set of utilities and controls, written in JavaScript, for building richly interactive web applications using techniques such as DOM scripting, HTML and AJAX. The UI Library Utilities facilitate the implementation of rich client-side features by enhancing and normalizing the developer’s interface to important elements of the browser infrastructure (such as events, in-page HTTP requests and the DOM). The Yahoo UI Library Controls produce visual, interactive user interface elements on the page with just a few lines of code and an included CSS file. All the components in the Yahoo! User Interface Library have been released as open source under a BSD license and are free for all uses.

Components include Calendar controls, sliders and tree views, as well as utilities for handling animations and working with the DHTML document object model more effectively. There’s an associated library of design patterns as well.

Looking good, and hopefully making it easier to deliver the type of web-based UI that works well with SOA applications.

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I’ve been doing some writing for the new developer section of the Register – looking at tools that could help businesses deliver better SOA implementations.

First, a look at Microsoft’s next generation UI development technology Expression Interactive Designer.

It’s been a long time coming. First rumoured at the 2003 PDC (Microsoft Professional Developers Conference), Microsoft’s Sparkle has finally made it part way out the door.More than two years after the original whispers of a Microsoft competitor to Flash, Expression Interactive Designer has arrived. Now you can finally start building all those innovative Windows Vista applications Microsoft has been hoping for.

And secondly, a look at how Salesforce.com is delivering a platform that can be used as a standalone application, a service host, or a service in its own right (all at the same time).

If Web 2.0 mashups are the future of the internet , what will the enterprise application look like? The folk at Salesforce.com think they have the answer, in the shape of the winter 06 release of their web application platform – and the introduction of a web service and application directory, the AppExchange

This is the new home for this blog.

I’ll be updating directories and feeds shortly.